Should You Get Certified in Backflow?


Backflow
Graywater from a system at a Florida residence is piped into the home’s drinking water. “Yellow gushy stuff” coming out of some taps in Maryland turns out to be the powerful—and highly toxic—herbicide Paraquat from an agricultural facility. Propane gas flowing into a Connecticut water main from a storage tank causes a washing machine to explode. “Rusty” water coming out of a Michigan hospital’s drinking fountain turns out to be blood from a nearby autopsy room. These stories are enough to curl your hair. These are all real-life incidents caused by backflow, usually the result of an accidental cross-connection between a potable water system and a contaminating source.    More
 
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 MARY ELIZABETH WILLIAMS-VILLANO

Rainwater Harvesting


Eco-Green Sustainable Landscapes
“Raindrops keep falling on my head” is the opening line of a popular song, but you can bet Burt Bacharach would be singing a different tune if those raindrops were falling inside his home. A ceiling leak can be more than a little annoying. If left unchecked, water will pour down from the ceiling and make a terrible mess.   More
 
Friday, May 16, 2014 Jason Gibby

Pumping Stations


Irrigation
When we think of a pump station, we’re usually thinking of water purveyors who are pumping water so your home can have potable water for drinking, showering, etc. Golf enthusiasts might see pumping stations as a way to pump water from one pond to another.    More
 
Saturday, March 1, 2008 KATIE NAVARRO

Cross Connection: an unprotected connection point between a drinking water source and any source of nonpotable water.


Irrigation
A cross connection is defined as an unprotected connection point between a drinking water source and any source of nonpotable water. If a cross-connection point is not protected, it is possible for the flow of water to reverse its direction.    More
 
Monday, April 21, 2008 KATIE NAVARRO

Backflow Prevention:The Forefront of Responsible Irrigation


Backflow
As the demand for potable water exceeds supply, the responsibility of the irrigation contractor grows. The contractor must protect public water supplies from contamination.    More
 
Monday, April 21, 2008

Backflow Prevention: Protecting Water, Protecting Yourself


Backflow
For potable water, life is a series of one-way streets. Safe drinking water depends on all “traffic” within a water system to move in the direction it’s supposed to. Fresh water flows one way. It isn’t supposed to turn around and travel in the other direction.    More
 
Monday, June 5, 2006 ELIZABETH LEXAU

Follow the Purple Pipe


Irrigation
Although recent flooding across the Midwest has caused many people to shelve their water shortage concerns, officials are still alert to the possibility of drought, over-consumption and other forces that limit our water supplies. In several regions of the U.S., the worst is not yet over.    More
 
Wednesday, May 14, 2008 AMANDA RICHTER

Is Graywater in Your Future?


Miscellaneous
Imagine doing a load of laundry, collecting the water from the machine, and then using it to water your trees. Imagine that you’ve just finished taking a bath and instead of letting the water go down the drain as you normally would, you collect it and use it when you need to irrigate your lawn. Water, especially potable water, is beginning to run in short supply and we need to find creative ways to reuse it.   More
 
Monday, January 12, 2009 RYAN FRIEDMAN

Let It Rain

By adding rainwater system installations to their list of services, landscape contractors will be prepared to take on a future that is growing greener everyday.


Miscellaneous
SUPPLY AND DEMAND IS A concept familiar to any good businessman. The more people want something, the more they’ll pay to get it. It’s as simple as that. Nothing illustrates this more clearly than the mind-numbing high oil prices that have become a constant in this day and age.   More
 
Tuesday, March 17, 2009 RYAN FRIEDMAN

Gray Water Flows Green


Miscellaneous
Seventy years ago, there were approximately 150 million people living in this country. Today, that number has more than doubled. The population explosion has taken its toll on our nation’s water supply. As a result of increased demand, many of our aquifers are at low levels, and wetlands throughout the country have gone dry. A dilapidated water infrastructure has exacerbated the problem.   More
 
Monday, June 15, 2009 RYAN FRIEDMAN

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