Should You Get Certified in Backflow?


Backflow
Graywater from a system at a Florida residence is piped into the home’s drinking water. “Yellow gushy stuff” coming out of some taps in Maryland turns out to be the powerful—and highly toxic—herbicide Paraquat from an agricultural facility. Propane gas flowing into a Connecticut water main from a storage tank causes a washing machine to explode. “Rusty” water coming out of a Michigan hospital’s drinking fountain turns out to be blood from a nearby autopsy room. These stories are enough to curl your hair. These are all real-life incidents caused by backflow, usually the result of an accidental cross-connection between a potable water system and a contaminating source.    More
 
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 MARY ELIZABETH WILLIAMS-VILLANO

The Tale of One City


Eco-Green Sustainable Landscapes
Sun Valley, a community in the San Fernando Valley, is one of the many suburbs in the city of Los Angeles. Like the rest of Southern California, it lies in a semi-arid climate zone, where the average rainfall is only about 12 inches a year. Water has always been an issue in this region.   More
 
Monday, December 16, 2013 Susan Maddocks

Understanding Backflow


Backflow
In May Of 2000, residents living around the subdivision in Pineville, North Carolina, known as Walden Pointe discovered that their drinking water had become contaminated with raw sewage. The contamination reached around 60 homes and more than 100 Walden Pointe residents fell ill. The affected citizens sued their municipality and received a $1.2 million settlement to cover their damages and medical expenses.   More
 
Friday, March 16, 2012

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